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Author Topic: Old Smoke 5  (Read 153 times)

Offline lone hunter

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  • Location: N. Idaho
Old Smoke 5
« on: March 05, 2019, 03:07:55 PM »
Drew a cow moose tag a few years back (quite a few).  Was with my son this particular day driving the roads and glassing the hill sides.  Quite a bit of snow which kinda limited how we could hunt the higher country.  We spotted a couple cows but we were after a younger, tender eating piece of meat.  Eventually, my son spotted a young cow followed by a bull on a hillside above us.  They were moving at a walk so I thought maybe I could intercept them. Left my gear at the truck and started wallering up the hill.  After a bit, I was able to get her in my sights.  It was a fairly easy drag in the snow as the hill was very steep. Backed the pick-up into the road bank and rolled her in. Well... maybe not quite that easy, sweat soaked by the time we were done.

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Online doc nock

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Re: Old Smoke 5
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2019, 03:58:02 PM »
Once while living in Helena MT area, a friend's wife drew a cow moose permit and she got one, on a late season adventure...

He asked ifI'd help process it in exchange for meat... I bit...

Lord...he put a 6x6 across the garage beams and affixed an Eye bolt into it and we hung it with block and tackle... then skinned it...

We folded the hide up and I attempted to lift it off the floor...I had parts of me in my socks after the first try...

Another time a guy brought a tanned moose hide to a saddle shop to have chaps made... the owner wanted to send the hide out to have it split but the guy wanted it whole hide.  We made em and oiled em good.

The purchaser was a big chap! He wore them, got caught in the rain and when they pulled up under some trees, he wouldn't dismount.... said he would break a leg when he touched the ground and would never get back on his horse...those thick hide chaps were soaked and weighed a ton...when they dried he brought them back to the shop to have them dismantled and the material sent out to have the hide split... he got 2 sets of chaps for little more then the price of one set....them mice got some thick ole hide

Offline lone hunter

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Re: Old Smoke 5
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2019, 07:02:58 PM »
Yes, the hides are hard to work with.  I sent this one off to Colorado or someplace and got it tanned. It's draped over my chair and I am sitting on it right now. They're good for a lot of small projects.  I back my Saunders archery tab with it.  Would hate to be lugging the hide around as clothing. Want to try and use some for moccasin bottoms with crepe glued on for a little traction. 
Been putting in for Montana bull moose for 4 years or so, with preference pts should draw this year or next.