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Author Topic: The Barrel Seasoning Myth  (Read 416 times)

Offline bwallace10327

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The Barrel Seasoning Myth
« on: August 07, 2017, 11:31:50 PM »
It shouldn't be a new concept, but I don't buy it and would appreciate anything proving me wrong.  Building a cake of bore butter in the barreling gunks up the barrel and traps residue, thereby preventing the barrel from ever getting clean.  Am I wrong?  This is a rifle, not cookware.  Do advantages to this practice exist? 

Online Rob DiStefano

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Re: The Barrel Seasoning Myth
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2017, 07:17:25 AM »
i don't buy it, either.  actually, shooting is the best medicine as it hones/laps the bore.  after shoot care is super important and that's all about dissolving the bp residue with tepid (not hot) tap water, and a light oiling. 

Online doc nock

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Re: The Barrel Seasoning Myth
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2017, 08:19:27 AM »
They say confession is good for the soul...

In PA, for our very short BP Flinter season, I drank that kool-aide. 

Hot water, bore butter etc..but my Germanic nature had me checking my BP gun bbl mid year and I could always get feint red patches out after the bore butter.

Rob's explained that the scalding hot water helps to create flash rust... Somewhere, I also read those "grease" type coatings still allow rusting to occur UNDER the layer of grease coating...

I never cut a bbl apart to check, but, my anecdotal evidence is that mid year I got light red patches out of my bbls that were cleaned squeaky clean, used hot water (and soap), rinsed well, then greased.

I will be following the suggestions here of light oil and tepid water this go around...

Offline okawbow

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Re: The Barrel Seasoning Myth
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2017, 03:02:58 PM »
Modern steels have a grain structure that is too close for anything to soak in and "season" the metal like you do a cast iron pan. I just finished a rifle with an original wrought iron barrel I had bored and rifled. It might be able to be seasoned since it is iron and not steel.

To avoid the slight rust on the patches you get even after protecting with grease, swab with a water displacement product like WD40 after cleaning with any water or water based cleaners. Wait a few days before using the grease based protectant, but wipe again every day with WD40. Or use the Dutch Shultz waterless cleaning method.

Online Rob DiStefano

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Re: The Barrel Seasoning Myth
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2017, 03:11:38 PM »
exactly - today's barrels are steel and not #2 or #3 wrought iron. 

i do use moose milk (1:6 mix of ballistol:water) or LVL (lehigh valley lube) or wd40, but only after shooting at the range, keep the residue soft during the ride back to the ranch, where only tepid tap water is used to flush out the goop with a patched jag, then a few drying patches, then a light gun oiled patch to preserve.  it's too easy.

Online doc nock

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Re: The Barrel Seasoning Myth
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2017, 03:49:51 PM »
I've sure seasoned and re-seasoned cast iron cookware enough over the years...resurrecting some pretty sorry stuff at least once...

That makes perfect sense that steel is NOT iron per se... so seasoning makes intuitive sense to some not so deep thinkers, but in retrospect, I can see that it's a pipe dream, so to speak. :)

I'll stick with the recommended water clean and light oil from here on out!

Offline JamesV

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Re: The Barrel Seasoning Myth
« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2017, 04:29:37 AM »
I never take the barrel or hole liner out of my flinter.  After shooting I use windshield washer liquid to clean my barrel.  Works great. Then a few dry patches before using one with light oil.

Offline bwallace10327

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Re: The Barrel Seasoning Myth
« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2017, 07:23:41 AM »
What is the best method to remove excess bore butter? 

Online Rob DiStefano

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Re: The Barrel Seasoning Myth
« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2017, 07:48:20 AM »
shoot that krap out!   ;D


Offline N.Y. Yankee

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Re: The Barrel Seasoning Myth
« Reply #9 on: October 11, 2017, 09:39:45 AM »
I also believe that the barrel seasoning is not necessary or possible with today's modern steels. Maybe the old hand hammered iron barrels were seasoned but all of my guns are made of modern steel, not iron. I use windshield washer fluid or Windex on the range or in camp and lukewarm water to thoroughly flush the barrel at home. A good quality gun oil with rust preventative in the bore and out. alcohol dripped on a wiping patch cleans oil out of the bore well and a patch to dry. Im tired of the Bore Butter clogging nipples and getting poor ignition. Never had a misfire with oil and alcohol system.