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Author Topic: Still working on the squirrels  (Read 553 times)

Offline dhaverstick

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Still working on the squirrels
« on: June 19, 2017, 08:07:36 AM »
It was raining at daylight both Saturday and Sunday at my house but after the showers quit I got out to see if I could add some meat to the stew pot. It was hard for me to keep my powder dry with all the water dripping off the trees and a few squirrels got a pass when my flinter didn't ignite the way it should have. I did manage to kill three, though. Hunting them is tough this time of year. The little S.O.B.s never stay still and the cover is so thick that I just get lucky when one stops in an open area long enough for me to get a bead on him. Another thing is that it seems all I ever kill in the early season is old boars. It's still fun, though, and I surely do love to watch that cloud of blue smoke wafting through the air!

Darren



Online doc nock

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Re: Still working on the squirrels
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2017, 11:22:42 AM »
How do your MO Squirrels skin?  By fall in PA, they're hide was stuck on when season opened such that they were pure T misery to skin...I quit killing them, but they sure do eat well!

Offline dhaverstick

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Re: Still working on the squirrels
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2017, 12:05:09 PM »
The young'uns skin more easily than the old ones but neither are any big chore with a good, sharp knife. A pair of anvil pruners also come in handy to cut off the feet and head. There are lots of methods for skinning them critters. I use the one my daddy taught me where you take their "pants" off first and then take their "shirt" off. It goes quicker if you have somebody to help hold them but it ain't too bad doing it by yourself.

The United Bowhunters of Missouri is having a squirrel fry this coming weekend. I am helping supply the raw materials.

Darren

Online doc nock

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Re: Still working on the squirrels
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2017, 02:55:17 PM »
I'd seen a few videos on TG of how to skin by cutting around the tail and down back legs, stand on the legs or tail and pull... I ended up with a hind quarter in my hand! :(

Course, I'd have to guess the hide might be a touch thicker on a Northern Grey in winter then this time of year down here, but that is pure speculation on my part!

I'm sure all will be grateful for your efforts at the squirrel feast!

Online goingoldskool

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Re: Still working on the squirrels
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2017, 06:37:10 PM »
Your flinter sure is a beautiful piece. .... what's the specs on her?
This time of year that's some outstanding shooting!

God bless,

Rodd

Offline dhaverstick

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Re: Still working on the squirrels
« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2017, 07:54:43 AM »
Rodd, I'm shooting a scattergun so my shooting doesn't have to be spot on. This one was made for me by my good friend, John Pruitt. It's a 12 gauge smoothbore with a 42" Colerain barrel. I have a blade front sight and a buckhorn rear sight. The lock is a left hand large Siler. John carved the stock out of some walnut he had on hand.

Lately, my squirrel load has been 75 grains of FFF, 1 overpowder card, 1/4" lubed fiber wad, 1 1/2 oz. #6 shot, and 1 overshot card. If I'm hunting turkeys with this gun I will use a paper shot cup to tighten my pattern. For squirrels I just pour the shot down the barrel.

Next month I'm fixing to meet up with John in Arkansas and bring him some walnut boards from a tree cut off my farm. He's making a couple of rifles for my dad and me and will use that wood for the stocks. Dad is getting a short 50 caliber Hawken half-stock percussion cap and I'm getting a 54 caliber full-stock flinter. I haven't decided yet whether to use the 38" Colerain swamped barrel or the 42" swamped barrel.

John is a heckuva craftsman and can make you a gun in short order. The last one he made for me took about a month. He generally charges $150 plus parts and that's with him furnishing the stock wood. It's hard to beat a deal like that!

Darren

Online goingoldskool

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Re: Still working on the squirrels
« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2017, 05:56:12 PM »
Darren,
He sure did  a good job on it... I got to reading your earlier posts and saw your load out.  I didn't know if you were still using the same and I was wanting more particulars on the gun itself. Thank you sir for the info!  Does John have a Website or just work from home?  I'd like to see more of his handiwork! 

Thanks again!

God bless,

Rodd

Offline dhaverstick

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Re: Still working on the squirrels
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2017, 08:07:55 AM »
John does not have a website. In fact, he didn't even have any business cards until I made these up for him. I believe they sum him up perfectly!


He has made me 4 guns so far and he's made some friends of mine several. Everyone is pleased with both the form and function. These guns are not Danny Caywood show pieces, they are tools to be used in the woods or on the range.

This is the first one he made for me. It's a 50 caliber Pennsylvania longrifle. I've killed several deer with it.


The second gun he made for me was the 12 gauge you have already seen.


For my 50th birthday, my brother said he would pay for John to make me a pistol. It's a 62 caliber smoothbore with a 12 inch barrel. I've killed lots of squirrels with it using shot but I really want to kill a deer with it using a PRB.


Last year, a good friend of mine got a 20 gauge flinter half-stock from him for turkey hunting. It has one of those Colerain barrels with the choke in it and, at 25 yards, I would put its pattern up against any modern shotgun. I had John make me a similar full-stock gun for turkeys. I haven't killed a bird with it yet but I did break it in on some bushy tails. That was a mistake! The tight pattern did a number on them and there wasn't much meat left. This gun is strictly for turkeys now. I really like how he dropped the stock so it's not in your face when the gun goes off. My other scattergun will leave a bruise after a while. The yellow trim on the gun is osage.



Darren