Black Powder Gang is all about the firearms, and their times and people,
that use "black powder" (known back in the day as "gun powder")
as the propellant for muzzleloading and cartridge guns of the 18th and 19th centuries.

Friends of the Gun
About Traditional Muzzleloaders

19th Century Single Shot Cartridge Rifles

Loading Black Powder
Paper Patched Bullet Cartridges
Snapshots of the Past

The American Sharps Shooters

The Denny Ducet Muzzleloader
Video Library


Recent Posts

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1
Gunsmithing, Gunmaking & Firearm Assemblies / Re: 40 Caliber Barn Gun
« Last post by Soonerlonbow on December 06, 2019, 10:17:04 AM »
If that thing shoots half as good as she’s gonna look....dang! What’s your plans for her? Mostly target?
2
The Campfire / Re: Black Powder Bear hunts
« Last post by Buff on December 05, 2019, 11:14:51 AM »
I would be interested in the details of this hunt.
Would you have a powder and caps on hand for us?
I have killed several bears with my bow but would like to take one with my rifle
3
Gunsmithing, Gunmaking & Firearm Assemblies / Re: 40 Caliber Barn Gun
« Last post by Mike Yancey on December 04, 2019, 06:36:12 PM »


Been on the scratch builds for the last two days. Its starting to take shape.


4
The Campfire / Re: Montana Pitch for patch lube?
« Last post by okawbow on December 04, 2019, 06:06:00 PM »
I don’t think it’s a good idea. It has pine pitch, which is a resin, in it. It could leave a hard, varnish residue inside the bore.

It also has mink oil, which by itself, is great for a patch lube. I use pure bear oil for hunting patches. Works great in any weather. Lubes with wax get too stiff in cold weather.
5
The Campfire / Re: Montana Pitch for patch lube?
« Last post by N.Y. Yankee on December 04, 2019, 10:00:30 AM »
No, I'd like to learn about it.
6
The Campfire / Re: New to Black powder rifle
« Last post by N.Y. Yankee on December 04, 2019, 09:17:26 AM »
Do not fall into the old wives tale of "seasoning the bore" as many uninformed people will tell you you must do. It usually causes more problems than it is supposed to prevent.  Our guns are made with steel, not wrought iron as the originals were. They can not, really, be seasoned. What you can do though is "condition" the bore which basically means "burnishing" or smoothing the bore and smoothing the rifling and that is mostly done by shooting. That will help your accuracy and ease of loading. Look into patch and bullet lubes as there is a lot to be understood about patches and lubes.

You don't need to buy cleaning patches! Get an old pair of flannel pajamas and cut them up into 1.5 inch squares. You will need them!

Plain water is good for cleaning. Doesn't need to be HOT, hot makes it difficult to handle, just warm is fine, and you use a pumping motion with a ramrod to pump water in and out the barrel. This will "power flush" the breech and nipple area. Once you feel everything is well cleaned, dry it thoroughly with flannel patches and use a good gun oil to mop the bore and breech area to prevent rust. I like to run an oiled patch down the bore of all my black powder guns one a month. Gives me an excuse to fondle the guns and also check for rust.

Before loading the gun, swab out the bore with some Isopropyl alcohol to remove the oil. Gun oil and black powder makes a fouling that is thick and tough and requires swabbing every couple of shots. Keep a small bottle of Isopropyl gas dryer in your shooting bag. It's cheap.

There is a lot to learn in Black Powder shooting, that's why the smart guys set up this web site. Ask lots of questions and you will get the hang of it! :thumbs:
7
Hunting / Re: Old rifle back in service
« Last post by doc nock on December 01, 2019, 01:19:51 PM »
Nice... I'd think that hard maple be hard to work... but you did a fine job...

BACK in the day, you could find people willing to deal like that... Some still around, not many me thinks... ???
8
Hunting / Re: Old rifle back in service
« Last post by okawbow on November 30, 2019, 10:18:44 PM »
.
[/quote]

Dang, man! I'd like to know where you found that board! That's got some nice grain to it, not to mention some darn good workmanship, especially for your second build! Glad to see you're putting her back in service.
[/quote]

Not knowing any better; I expected to find some curly maple at a local sawmill in Fayette County Illinois. Well, the sawyer said he had some hard maple bridge planks someone had sawed a couple years earlier, and never picked up. I could have one for $10 if I restacked the pile. I found a nice board and used it for that rifle and 20 years later, started a Bedford Co. rifle that too k 15 years to finish. Here it is.
9
Hunting / Re: Old rifle back in service
« Last post by 30coupe on November 30, 2019, 09:26:24 PM »
I dug out an old longrifle I made in 1974, when I was 20 years old. It was the second muzzleloader I made. I used a .45 cal. Douglas barrel, 44” long, and 7/8” across the flats. I made the stock from a board, and also made the ramrod pipes, sights, trigger, and inlays. The lock was a Spanish made flintlock that never really worked well enough. I carried the gun deer hunting a couple times, but never took one with it.

Dang, man! I'd like to know where you found that board! That's got some nice grain to it, not to mention some darn good workmanship, especially for your second build! Glad to see you're putting her back in service.
10
Hunting / Re: Old rifle back in service
« Last post by goingoldskool on November 30, 2019, 04:23:22 PM »
I'm with Doc on this..... if you made that stock from a board, you DID REAL GOOD!  Lots of people on here and other forums that routinely take deer with .45s.... 
Also as Doc said. ... shot placement trumps cal size.

Good luck and keep us posted!
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